Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

Finland

Siberian primrose has not had time to adapt to climate change

(University of Helsinki) Global warming already affects Siberian primrose, a plant species that is threatened in Finland and Norway. According to a recently completed study, individuals of Siberian primrose originating in the Finnish coast on the Bothnian Bay currently fare better in northern Norway than in their home area. The results indicate that the species may not be able to adapt to quickly progressing climate change, which could potentially lead to its extinction.

Glyphosate may affect human gut microbiota

More than half of bacterial species in the core of the human gut microbiome are potentially sensitive to glyphosate, shows new research. Researchers introduced the first bioinformatics resource to determine and test the potential sensitivity of organisms to glyphosate.

More children and youth drowning as warming temperatures create unstable lake ice

As winters become milder and lake ice less stable, more children and young adults are falling through the ice and fatally drowning, say researchers. A new study, which looked at 4,000 drownings in 10 countries, including Canada, Russia, Finland, Germany, Sweden, and the United States, found warming winter air temperatures were a good predictor of the number of drownings.

Dry food or raw? Diet affects skin gene expression in both healthy and atopic dogs

Differences in skin gene expression were observed between healthy and atopic Staffordshire Bull Terriers as well as between dogs that ate either dry food or raw food. Raw food appeared to activate the skin’s immune system as well as the expression of genes that increase antioxidant production or have anti-inflammatory effects.

Prenatal thyroid hormones influence ‘biological age’ at birth

The environment we experience in early-life is known to have major consequences on later-life health and lifespan. A new study using an avian model suggests that increased prenatal exposure to maternal thyroid hormones could have beneficial effects on the ‘biological age’ at birth.

Dietary overlap of birds, bats and dragonflies disadvantageous in insect decline

According to a new study, different groups of insectivores compete for the same type of food. Researchers made the discovery by comparing birds, bats and dragonflies that forage in the same area in Southwest Finland. These very distantly related predators consumed the same insect groups. The results shed new light on the decline in insect populations.

Swedish, Finnish and Russian wolves closely related

(Uppsala University) The Scandinavian wolf originally came from Finland and Russia, and unlike many other European wolf populations its genetic constitution is virtually free from dog admixture. In addition, individuals have migrated into and out of Scandinavia. These findings have emerged from new research at Uppsala University in which genetic material from more than 200 wolves was analysed. The study is published in the journal Evolutionary Applications.

Uncategorized

Green prescriptions could undermine the benefits of spending time in nature

Spending time in nature is believed to benefit people’s mental health. However, new research suggests that giving people with existing mental health conditions formal ‘green prescriptions’, may undermine some of the benefits.

Uncategorized

Green prescriptions could undermine the benefits of spending time in nature

Spending time in nature is believed to benefit people’s mental health. However, new research suggests that giving people with existing mental health conditions formal ‘green prescriptions’, may undermine some of the benefits.

Green prescriptions could undermine the benefits of spending time in nature

Spending time in nature is believed to benefit people’s mental health. However, new research suggests that giving people with existing mental health conditions formal ‘green prescriptions’, may undermine some of the benefits.