Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

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Penn State to lead critical minerals consortium powered by $1.2 million from DOE

(Penn State) A region famous for the coal that once fueled a growing nation is now the focus of a $1.2 million project, led by Penn State researchers, aimed at establishing domestic supplies of critical minerals needed to produce modern technology from cell phones to fighter jets.

Archaeologists pinpoint population for the Greater Angkor region

(University of Oregon) Long-running archaeological research, boosted by airborne lidar sensing and machine-learning algorithms, finds that Cambodia’s Greater Angkor region was home to 700,000-900,000 people. The new estimate, made possible by a study designed at the University of Oregon, is the first for the entire 3,000-square-kilometer low-density region.

New research team launches to combat the effects of climate change on workers and communities

(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) The Center for Health, Work & Environment at the Colorado School of Public Health (ColoradoSPH) and the Colorado Consortium on Climate Change and Human Health have launched the Climate, Work & Health Initiative (CWHI). CWHI is an interdisciplinary team of expert researchers, scientists, doctors, and public health professionals dedicated to combating the effects of climate change on vulnerable populations.

UAlbany Meteorologist: NOAA’s Observed Warming Trend a Sign of Global Climate Change – Newswise

ALBANY, N.Y. (May 6, 2021) – A new report released this week by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) shows that the United States is getting warmer and parts of it are getting wetter. NOAA’s “new normals” set of…

ORNL’s Sergei Kalinin elected Fellow of the Microscopy Society of America

(DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory) Sergei Kalinin, a scientist and inventor at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has been elected a Fellow of the Microscopy Society of America professional society.

Physicists describe new type of aurora

(University of Iowa) The famed northern and southern lights have been studied for millennia, but they still hold secrets. In a new study, physicists led by the University of Iowa describe a new phenomenon they call “diffuse auroral erasers,” in which patches of the background glow are blotted out, then suddenly intensify and reappear.

Small things can have a major effect on the prevention of biodiversity loss

(University of Helsinki) The population growth of an endangered butterfly species is greatest in habitats with microclimatic variability, demonstrates a study carried out collaboratively by the Faculty of Biological and Environmental Sciences and the Helsinki Institute of Life Science of the University of Helsinki as well as the Finnish Environment Institute.

Study offers earliest evidence of humans changing ecosystems with fire

(Yale University) Mastery of fire has given humans dominance over the natural world. A Yale-led study provides the earliest evidence to date of ancient humans significantly altering entire ecosystems with flames.

UBCO researcher uses geology to help astronomers find habitable planets

(University of British Columbia Okanagan campus) Astronomers have identified more than 4,000, and counting, confirmed exoplanets — planets orbiting stars other than the sun — but only a fraction have the potential to sustain life.Now, new research from UBC’s Okanagan campus is using the geology of early planet formation to help identify those that may be capable of supporting life.

NYUAD study sequences genome of extinct date palms germinated from 2,000 year-old seeds

(New York University) Researchers from NYU Abu Dhabi’s Center for Genomics and Systems Biology have successfully sequenced the genome of previously extinct date palm varieties that lived more than 2,000 years ago.