Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

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Warbler coloration shaped by evolution via distinct paths

Two genes that are important for the diverse colors and patterns of warbler plumage have evolved through two very different processes, according to a new study. These evolutionary processes could help explain the rapid evolution of these songbirds into so many unique species.

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Evidence of the interconnectedness of global climate

(Harvard University) The analysis, published in Nature, shows for the first time that changes in the Antarctic ice sheet were caused by the melting of ice sheets in the Northern Hemisphere. The influence was driven by sea-level changes caused by the melting ice in the north during the past 40,000 years.

NSF says Arecibo telescope will be dismantled

Heartbreaking news. After 57 years as a world-class resource for astronomy, the iconic Arecibo telescope is to be decommissioned, or withdrawn from service, the NSF announced today. The dish-type radio telescope – built into a natural depression in the landscape in Puerto Rico – appears to be headed for a “controlled disassembly.”

Increasing diversity and community participation in environmental engineering

(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Black, Hispanic, and Native American students and faculty are largely underrepresented in environmental engineering programs in the ) States. A pathway for increasing diversity and community participation in the environmental engineering discipline

Health trade-offs for wildlife as urbanization expands

City living appears to improve reproductive success for migratory tree swallows compared to breeding in more environmentally protected areas, a new five-year study suggests. But urban life comes with a big trade-off – health hazards linked to poorer water quality.

Community helps scientists evaluate smoke forecasts

Across the Wasatch Front, both researchers and community members maintain enough air quality sensors to provide a high-resolution picture of how the smoke moved through the valley — perfect for testing and refining smoke forecast models.

Britain Helps World’s Most Remote Inhabited Islands to Establish Biggest Marine Sanctuary in the Atlantic

Centered around the small archipelago of Tristan da Cunha in the Southern Atlantic, governments and ecological organizations have created the fourth-largest marine protected area on Earth, and the largest in the Atlantic Ocean. Spanning 265,347 square miles, Tristan da Cunha is almost three times as big as the island of Great Britain, and will protect […]

The post Britain Helps World’s Most Remote Inhabited Islands to Establish Biggest Marine Sanctuary in the Atlantic appeared first on Good News Network.

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Britain Helps World’s Most Remote Inhabited Islands to Establish Biggest Marine Sanctuary in the Atlantic

Centered around the small archipelago of Tristan da Cunha in the Southern Atlantic, governments and ecological organizations have created the fourth-largest marine protected area on Earth, and the largest in the Atlantic Ocean. Spanning 265,347 square miles, Tristan da Cunha is almost three times as big as the island of Great Britain, and will protect […]

The post Britain Helps World’s Most Remote Inhabited Islands to Establish Biggest Marine Sanctuary in the Atlantic appeared first on Good News Network.

Uncategorized

Britain Helps World’s Most Remote Inhabited Islands to Establish Biggest Marine Sanctuary in the Atlantic

Centered around the small archipelago of Tristan da Cunha in the Southern Atlantic, governments and ecological organizations have created the fourth-largest marine protected area on Earth, and the largest in the Atlantic Ocean. Spanning 265,347 square miles, Tristan da Cunha is almost three times as big as the island of Great Britain, and will protect […]

The post Britain Helps World’s Most Remote Inhabited Islands to Establish Biggest Marine Sanctuary in the Atlantic appeared first on Good News Network.

New tool predicts geological movement and the flow of groundwater in old coalfields

(University of Nottingham) A remote monitoring tool to help authorities manage public safety and environmental issues in recently abandoned coal mines has been developed by the University of Nottingham.The tool uses satellite radar imagery to capture millimetre-scale measurements of changes in terrain height. Such measurements can be used to monitor and forecast groundwater levels and changes in geological conditions deep below the earth’s surface in former mining areas.