Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

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New low-cost solutions could save sea turtles from a climate change-induced sex crisis | TheHill – The Hill

Because of global warming, most newborn sea turtles are female, which could put their long-term survival at risk. New research reveals that in addition to more widely used techniques such as shading and irrigation, the splitting of the turtle nests,…

Small things can have a major effect on the prevention of biodiversity loss

(University of Helsinki) The population growth of an endangered butterfly species is greatest in habitats with microclimatic variability, demonstrates a study carried out collaboratively by the Faculty of Biological and Environmental Sciences and the Helsinki Institute of Life Science of the University of Helsinki as well as the Finnish Environment Institute.

Scientists have cultured the first stable coral cell lines

(Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University) Researchers in Japan have established sustainable cell lines in a coral – a success which could prove to be a pivotal moment for gaining a deeper understanding of the biology of these vital marine creatures. Seven out of eight cell cultures, seeded from the stony coral, Acropora tenuis, have continuously proliferated for over 10 months. The results were published in Marine Biotechnology on the 26th April 2021.

Defense mechanisms in aphids can become a double-edged sword, sharpened by the seasons

(Drexel University) In a newly published study in Molecular Ecology a team of Drexel University scientists examined the biological variations in pea aphids, insects that reproduce frequently enough to evolve before our eyes, by tracing the prevalence of their protective endosymbiont, Hamiltonella defensa, which the insects use to ward off parasitoid wasps.

Dutch Citizens are Using a “Doorbell” to Help Fish Pass Through the Canal Gate

Tasked with helping ensure Utrecht’s canals remain full of life, and convincing everyone it wasn’t an April Fools’ Day joke, two ecologists in the Dutch city have invented the world’s first “fish doorbell.” An underwater, live-streaming camera at the “Weerdsluis” lock door allows residents to ring a virtual doorbell heard by the local lock keeper […]

The post Dutch Citizens are Using a “Doorbell” to Help Fish Pass Through the Canal Gate appeared first on Good News Network.

Egg and sperm cell size evolved from competition

(Northwestern University) Using mathematical modeling, researchers considered a time very early in evolution when primordial species reproduced using external fertilization. In the model, bigger reproductive cells, or gametes, presented a competitive edge because they could hold more nutrients for a potential zygote. Smaller gametes, however, required fewer resources to make, which put less stress on the parent. Organisms evolved to specialize in large or small gametes, precursors to eggs and sperm.

Annotated Bibliography: Synthetic Turf and Climate, health, biodiversity and microplastics pollution issues

Increasing use of synthetic surfaces and synthetic turf is problematic for Several reasons.  Synthetic turf is: Derived from fossil fuel petrochemical industry Produces greenhouse gas emissions during manufacturing and as it degrades Increases landfill at end of life Produces micro-plastic…

Silk moth’s diapause reverts back to ancestors’ through gene editing!?

(Shinshu University) Diapause is a phenomenon in which animals and insects foresee changes in the environment and actively reduce metabolism, or halt regular differentiation and development. By knocking out genes that allow the silkworm to detect temperature, researchers found that the silk moth diapause changes from temperature to day length. This is not only valuable for the molecular mechanism in the environmental response, but also an important finding in exploring the process of domestication of silk moths.