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Global warming. Inequality. COVID-19. And Al Gore is … Optimistic? – Grist

News on climate in the time of coronavirus Subscribe today This story was originally published by Wired and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Before he was the guy with the climate change PowerPoint presentation, before…

The Planet’s Future Has Never Looked Brighter

Doomsday thinking about the environment has been popular for decades. A rational optimist lays out the many reasons we can be hopeful about the future of the planet. In 1980, the year that PERC was founded, I spent three months…

Media tip sheet: Ecological forecasting

(Ecological Society of America) These presentations feature research that attempts to forecast ecosystems of the future. All will be presented at the Ecological Society of America’s upcoming virtual annual meeting, August 3-6, 2020.

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Scientists urge caution, further assessment of ecological impacts above deep sea mining

A new study argues that deep-sea mining poses significant risks, not only to the area immediately surrounding mining operations but also to the water hundreds to thousands of feet above the seafloor, threatening vast midwater ecosystems. Further, the scientists suggest how these risks could be evaluated more comprehensively to enable society and managers to decide if and how deep-sea mining should proceed.

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A ‘regime shift’ is happening in the Arctic Ocean

Scientists find the growth of phytoplankton in the Arctic Ocean has increased 57 percent over just two decades, enhancing its ability to soak up carbon dioxide. While once linked to melting sea ice, the increase is now propelled by rising concentrations of tiny algae.

Aquaculture’s role in nutrition in the COVID-19 era

(American University) A new paper from American University examines the economics of an aquaculture industry of the future that is simultaneously environmentally sustainable and nutritious for the nearly 1 billion people worldwide who depend on it.

Evolution makes the world less ragged

(University of Connecticut) How does evolution impact ecological patterns? It helps smooth out the rough edges, says UConn Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Professor Mark Urban. Urban led an international team of researchers through a review of the history of ecological and evolutionary research to establish a framework to better understand evolution’s impact on ecosystem patterns. The research is published as a perspective in the Proceeding of the National Academy of Sciences.