Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

Drought

Conditions ripe for active amazon fire, Atlantic hurricane seasons

(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) Warmer than average sea surface temperatures in the tropical North Atlantic Ocean so far in 2020 have set the stage for an active hurricane season and elevated the risk of fires in the southern Amazon, according to scientists at NASA and the University of California, Irvine.

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Texas will face driest conditions of the last 1,000 years

Texas’ future climate will feature drier summers and decreasing water supplies for much of the state for the remainder of the 21st century — likely resulting in the driest conditions the state has endured in the last 1,000 years, according to a team of researchers.

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Dry tropical forests may be more at risk than wet rainforests, study says

Dry tropical forests are more vulnerable to the impacts of global heating than had been thought, according to new research, with wildlife and plants at severe risk of harm from human impacts. Some tropical forests are very wet, but others…

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Arizona reels as three of the biggest wildfires in its history ravage state

For residents of Tucson in southern Arizona, the Santa Catalina Mountains in the Coronado national forest are known as a hub for hiking, mountain biking and other outdoor recreation. But on 5 June lightning ignited a wildfire that has grown…

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To listen is to survive: Unravelling how plants process information

Researchers mapped the signaling network in plants and discovered novel insights about how plants process information about their environment. This gives new potential to strategies to protect crops and help them thrive in the time of increasing droughts.

Learn from the pandemic to prevent environmental catastrophe, scientists argue

(University of Cambridge) COVID-19 is comparable to climate and extinction emergencies. All share features such as lagged impacts, feedback loops, and complex dynamics. Delayed action in the pandemic cost lives and economic growth, just as it will with environmental crises – but on a scale ‘too grave to contemplate’, say scientists from UK and US.