Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

Disease

Sea otters have low genetic diversity like other threatened species, biologists report

Sea otters have very low genetic diversity, scientists report. Their findings have implications for the conservation of rare and endangered species, in which a lack of genetic diversity can increase the risk of extinction.

Global Warming Is Pushing Microbes into Damaging Climate Feedback Loops & Raising Health Risks – InsideClimate News

All life on Earth evolved from microorganisms in the primordial slime, and billions of years later, the planet’s smallest life forms—including bacteria, plankton and viruses—are still fundamental to the biosphere. They cycle minerals and nutrients through soil, water and the…

What is valley fever?

Valley fever is on the rise. Cases of this dangerous and sometimes fatal condition have tripled in the past decade, to the point where the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have dubbed it a “silent epidemic.” Fewer than…

Guest blog – The Ethics of Animal Exploitation part 2 by Alick Simmons

Alick Simmons is a veterinarian, naturalist and photographer.  After a period in private practice, he followed a 35-year career as a Government veterinarian, latterly as the UK Government’s Deputy Chief Veterinary Officer. Alick’s lifelong passion is wildlife; he volunteers for…

Without swift action on climate change, heat waves could kill thousands in U.S. cities – NBC News

If global warming sometimes seems like a distant or abstract threat, new research casts the phenomenon in stark, life-or-death terms. It predicts that in the absence of significant progress in efforts to curb emissions of temperature-raising greenhouse gases, extreme heat…

2019 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming News Roundup #24

Latest Posts Archives Climate Hustle Posted on 15 June 2019 by John Hartz A chronological listing of news articles posted on the Skeptical Science Facebook Page during the past week, i.e., Sun, Jun 9 through Sat, June 15, 2019 Editor’s…

UMass Amherst cell biologist chosen for Pew Scholars Biomedical Research Program

(University of Massachusetts at Amherst) University of Massachusetts Amherst biologist Lillian Fritz-Laylin is one of 22 early-career researchers selected for the Pew Scholars Program in the Biomedical Sciences, the Pew Charitable Trusts announced Friday, June 14, 2019.

Gut microbes eat our medication

Researchers have discovered one of the first concrete examples of how the microbiome can interfere with a drug’s intended path through the body. Focusing on levodopa (L-dopa), the primary treatment for Parkinson’s disease, they identified which bacteria out of the trillions of species is responsible for degrading the drug and how to stop this microbial interference.