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Sniffing your way to the gym

(University of California – Riverside) On a near daily basis, the internet spews out numerous tips and tricks for exercise motivation. Now we can add smell to the long and growing list. A research team led by a scientist at the University of California, Riverside, has found olfaction–or smell–may play an important role in motivating mammals to engage in voluntary exercise. Performed in lab mice, the study may open up new areas of research and have relevance for humans.

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Some Like It Hot: Global Warming Triggered the Evolution of Giant Dinosaurs – SciTechDaily

Live reconstruction of the early sauropod Bagualia alba. Credit: Jorge Gonzales Global warming triggered the evolution of giant dinosaurs. An international team of paleontologists, including LMU Professor Oliver Rauhut, finds evidence of rapid climate change 180 million years ago as…

Some Like It Hot: Global Warming Triggered the Evolution of Giant Dinosaurs – SciTechDaily

Live reconstruction of the early sauropod Bagualia alba. Credit: Jorge Gonzales Global warming triggered the evolution of giant dinosaurs. An international team of paleontologists, including LMU Professor Oliver Rauhut, finds evidence of rapid climate change 180 million years ago as…

Experimental evolution reveals how bacteria gain drug resistance

A research team has succeeded in experimentally evolving the common bacteria under pressure from a large number of individual antibiotics, and identified the mechanisms and constraints underlying evolved drug resistance. Their findings help develop drug-treatment strategies that minimize the chance that bacteria will develop resistance.

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Social bacteria build shelters using the physics of fingerprints

When starvation threatens, forest-dwelling Myxococcus xanthus bacteria work collectively to form fruiting bodies, spongy mushroom-like growths that promote survival. Princeton researchers have identified how these bacteria harness the same physical laws that lead to the whorls of a fingerprint to build the structures layer by layer.

Today’s catastrophic concerns shaped by past interactions between science, culture

(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, News Bureau) “Catastrophic Thinking” may seem a title well timed for 2020, given its global pandemic, wildfires and hurricanes. David Sepkoski’s new book, however, is not a doomsday warning for the future, but a history of how concerns about threats to the planet and the human race came to be. He travels “from Darwin to the Anthropocene” to examine how science and culture have interacted to shape those views, especially on extinction and the value of diversity.

Algae breathe life into 3D engineered tissues

3D bioprinted algae can be harnessed as a sustainable source of oxygen for human cells in engineered vascularized tissues, researchers report. They embedded the bioprinted photosynthetic algae, along with human liver-derived cells, in a 3D hydrogel matrix to create honeycomb-shaped tissues with lobules, similar to the human liver.