Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

Coral

Prey-size plastics are invading larval fish nurseries

(Arizona State University, Center for Global Discovery and Conservation Science) A new study by researchers at Arizona State University’s Center for Global Discovery and Conservation Science (GDCS) and NOAA’s Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center has revealed that larval fish species from various ocean habitats are now being threatened by plastic pollution that infects their nursery habitats—at levels on average, eight times higher than those recently found in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. The study was published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Callum Roberts: ‘Sharks do bite people, they do kill people, but it’s more error than intention’

Callum Roberts is professor of marine conservation at York University and was chief scientific adviser on Blue Planet 2. His new book, Reef Life, details a life spent in the oceans studying the marine ecosystem. How was your first dive?It…

COP25 will review a scary year for climate change – Quartz

One year ago, the international scientific community could hardly have expected that Greta Thunberg, a teenager from Sweden, would become one of its greatest allies. Since beginning her weekly “School Strike for the Climate,” the petite 16-year-old has skillfully used…

A record CO2 rise rate since the KT dinosaur extinction 66 million years ago

By Andrew GliksonEarth and climate scientistAustralian National University As the concentration of atmospheric CO₂ has risen to 408 ppm and the total greenhouse gas level, including methane and nitrous oxide, combine to near 500 parts per million CO₂-equivalent, the stability…

A Scary Year for Climate Change – Scientific American

One year ago, the international scientific community could hardly have expected that Greta Thunberg, a teenager from Sweden, would become one of its greatest allies. Since beginning her weekly “School Strike for the Climate,” the petite 16-year-old has skillfully used…

A Scary Year for Climate Change – Undark Magazine

One year ago, the international scientific community could hardly have expected that Greta Thunberg, a teenager from Sweden, would become one of its greatest allies. Since beginning her weekly “School Strike for the Climate,” the petite 16-year-old has skillfully used…

Red algae thrive despite ancestor’s massive loss of genes

You’d think that losing 25 percent of your genes would be a big problem for survival. But not for red algae, including the seaweed used to wrap sushi. An ancestor of red algae lost about a quarter of its genes roughly one billion years ago, but the algae still became dominant in near-shore coastal areas around the world.

Corals from the twilight zone: Who eats what on a deep Red Sea reef

(Bar-Ilan University) Using remote operated underwater vehicles a group of scientists is collaborating on a new project to study coral reefs found below scuba diving depth. Little is known about these deep-water reef systems, but they may be very important for the survival of coral reefs under global climate change, and accessing these places using technical diving and ROVs is a crucial part of the current mission.

Strong winter dust storms may have caused the collapse of the Akkadian Empire

(Hokkaido University) Fossil coral records provide new evidence that frequent winter shamals, or dust storms, and a prolonged cold winter season contributed to the collapse of the ancient Akkadian Empire in Mesopotamia.