Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

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Oceans could return to a picture of health in just one generation

Our oceans face a number of threats, but if we act soon and act in concert, we can keep them healthy for future generations. (Photo: Nick Fewings [CC BY 2.0]/Flickr) Try to imagine the future as a tale of two…

Greenhouse gases could fall to levels not seen since WWII

Clear skies ahead. These days, you’ll be forgiven for hoping those words refer to the end of a pandemic that has forced millions to hunker down indoors. But in this case, those clear skies are literal. And when we finally…

NOAA’s Latest Bogus Climate Scare: ‘Near-Annual’ Reef Bleaching

Climate alarmists are back with a new and far-fetched Great Barrier Reef scare, just a few years after their most recent claims of massive coral death in the Reef proved false. No, alarmists, we are not entering a period of…

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Giant umbrellas shift from convenient canopy to sturdy storm shield

In a new approach to storm surge protection, a team has created a preliminary design for dual-purpose kinetic umbrellas that would provide shade during fair weather and could be tilted in advance of a storm to form a flood barrier. The researchers used computational modeling to begin evaluating the umbrellas’ ability to withstand an acute storm surge.

When warblers warn of cowbirds, blackbirds get the message

(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, News Bureau) This is the story of three bird species and how they interact. The brown-headed cowbird lays its eggs in other birds’ nests and lets them raise its young — often at the expense of the host’s nestlings. To combat this threat, yellow warblers have developed a special ‘seet’ call that means, ‘Look out! Cowbird!’ In a new study, researchers report that red-winged blackbirds respond to the seet call as if they know what it means.

Using fiber optics to advance safe and renewable energy

(DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) Fiber optic cables, it turns out, can be incredibly useful scientific sensors. Researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have studied them for use in carbon sequestration, groundwater mapping, earthquake detection, and monitoring of Arctic permafrost thaw. Now they have been awarded new grants to develop fiber optics for two novel uses: monitoring offshore wind operations and underground natural gas storage.

If a warm U.S. winter was ‘a preview of global warming,’ what part did a polar vortex play? – Getaka.co.in

The winter that just ended was the sixth-warmest on record in the contiguous United States, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. And one feature of that winter was a strong zonal, west-to-east flowing polar vortex. Wait, what? Usually…

Activist Judge Orders Review Of Pipeline Moving Oil For 3 Years

A judge with United States District Court for the District of Columbia ordered a review and could bring operations to a halt of a pipeline in North Dakota that has been successfully operating for the past three years since President…

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Neanderthals ate mussels, fish, and seals too

Over 80,000 years ago, Neanderthals fed themselves on mussels, fish and other marine life. The first evidence has been found by an international team in the cave of Figueira Brava in Portugal. The excavated layers date from 86,000 to 106,000 years ago, the period when Neanderthals settled in Europe. Sourcing food from the sea at that time had only been attributed to anatomically modern humans in Africa.