Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

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The Planet’s Future Has Never Looked Brighter

Doomsday thinking about the environment has been popular for decades. A rational optimist lays out the many reasons we can be hopeful about the future of the planet. In 1980, the year that PERC was founded, I spent three months…

Lead fallout from Notre Dame fire was likely overlooked

(Earth Institute at Columbia University) A new study, published today in GeoHealth, used soil samples collected from neighborhoods around the cathedral to estimate local amounts of lead fallout from the fire.

To Defeat The Climate Cult, Realists Need To Unite, Speak Out

Much is made of the fact that former “climate change” advocates have now defected to the side of reason. But much more needs to be done to defeat climate change propaganda. The latest defection, as we’ve noted here, is Michael…

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Another disaster to prepare for — global warming – The Washington Post

By Letters to the Editor, The July 4 front-page article “Raging fires, record heat in Siberia signal peril” reported on the perfect environmental-global warming storm of disappearing Arctic ice that not only no longer reflects the sun’s radiation but also reveals the…

Even if we start to fix climate change, the proof may not show up for 30 years – The Washington Post

In short, because of the massive amount of fossil fuels burned since the Industrial Revolution, and the complexity of the Earth’s climate, there’s no quick payoff from changing our fossil fuel habits, researchers found. The results lend added perspective to…

Our animal inheritance: Humans perk up their ears, too, when they hear interesting sounds

(Saarland University) Many animals move their ears to better focus their attention on a novel sound. That humans also have this capability was not known until now. A research team now has demonstrated that we make minute, unconscious movements of our ears that are directed towards the sound want to focus our attention on. The team discovered this ability by measuring electrical signals in the muscles of the vestigial motor system in the human ear. The results have now been published in the journal ‘eLife’.