Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

Cetaceans

Covid-19 and global warming: two good reasons to eat fewer animals – Open Democracy

Over the past year the world has witnessed an alarming succession of environmental disasters. Millions of hectares of forests have been incinerated in Amazonia and Australia. Floods have submerged whole cities like Venice and its historic and cultural heritage. An…

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Why do whales migrate? They return to the tropics to shed their skin

Whales undertake some of the longest migrations on earth, often swimming many thousands of miles, over many months, to breed in the tropics. The question is why? Scientists propose that whales that forage in polar waters migrate to low latitudes to maintain healthy skin.

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Why do whales migrate? They return to the tropics to shed their skin

Whales undertake some of the longest migrations on earth, often swimming many thousands of miles, over many months, to breed in the tropics. The question is why? Scientists propose that whales that forage in polar waters migrate to low latitudes to maintain healthy skin.

Uncategorized

Why do whales migrate? They return to the tropics to shed their skin

Whales undertake some of the longest migrations on earth, often swimming many thousands of miles, over many months, to breed in the tropics. The question is why? Scientists propose that whales that forage in polar waters migrate to low latitudes to maintain healthy skin.

Why do whales migrate? They return to the tropics to shed their skin, scientists say

(NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region) Whales undertake some of the longest migrations on earth, often swimming many thousands of miles, over many months, to breed in the tropics. The question is why? In a research paper in Marine Mammal Science, scientists propose that whales that forage in polar waters migrate to low latitudes to maintain healthy skin.

Early dispersal for quadrupedal cetaceans: amphibious whale from middle Eocene

(Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology) Lead author, Olivier Lambert, Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences, Bruxelles, Belgium, presented the team’s findings at this year’s annual meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology held this year in Brisbane, Australia.

Should we save the Thames whale – or has it come to save us?

Reports of an apparently healthy-looking young humpback in the Thames suggests that it is not only humans who are intent on an environmental uprising. As the founding emblem of the modern green movements, it seems apt that this leviathan appears…

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Scientists uncover genetic similarities among species that use sound to navigate

Insect-eating bats navigate effortlessly in the dark and dolphins and killer whales gobble up prey in murky waters thanks in part to specific changes in a set of 18 genes involved in the development of the cochlear ganglion — a group of nerves that transmit sound from the ear to the brain, according to a new study.

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Scientists uncover genetic similarities among species that use sound to navigate

Insect-eating bats navigate effortlessly in the dark and dolphins and killer whales gobble up prey in murky waters thanks in part to specific changes in a set of 18 genes involved in the development of the cochlear ganglion — a group of nerves that transmit sound from the ear to the brain, according to a new study.