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When Is the Right Time to Start Your Backyard Composter?

Vermont became the first state to mandate composting of food scraps. While this was the first state-wide mandate, there are cities across the U.S. that have also discussed or implemented laws requiring food waste to go into composters instead of the trash. California is set to start its mandatory food waste composting requirement in 2022. You’ve […]

Shift in diet allowed gray wolves to survive ice-age extinction

(Canadian Museum of Nature) Gray wolves are among the largest predators to have survived the extinction at the end of the last ice age. A new study analysing teeth and bones shows that the wolves may have survived by adapting their diet over thousands of years—from a primary reliance on horses during the Pleistocene, to caribou and moose today.

Why rescuing the climate and saving biodiversity go hand in hand – New Scientist

By Michael Le Page A kangaroo and her joey survey the aftermath of a wildfire in Mallacoota, Australia, in 2020 Jo-Anne McArthur/We Animals/naturepl THE Great Barrier Reef is already in a critical state. Rising sea temperatures are killing corals faster…

Where do the gender differences in the human pelvis come from?

(University of Vienna) The pelvis is the part of the human skeleton with the largest differences between females and males. The female birth canal is on average more spacious and exhibits shape features that enable birth of a large baby with a big brain. Thus far it was unclear when these pelvic differences first appeared in human evolution. Barbara Fischer from the University of Vienna and her coauthors have published a study in Nature Ecology & Evolution presenting new insights into the evolutionary origin of pelvic sex differences.

In World First, Key African Species Will be Relocated to Another Continent After it Became Extinct in India

A team of experts from South Africa and Namibia are helping to relocate a population of cheetahs to India in an ambitious restoration program that just got the go-ahead. It would be the first time ever that a major predator was moved inter-continentally to reestablish a population where it had once been, and India is […]

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New study reveals habitat that could increase jaguar numbers

(Defenders of Wildlife) This week, a new, peer-reviewed scientific study finds that there is far more potential jaguar habitat in the U.S. than was previously thought. Scientists identified an area of more than 20 million acres that could support jaguars in the U.S., 27 times the size of designated critical habitat.

10 Years After Fukushima Nuclear Disaster, Two Men Are Still Living There Taking Care of Everyone’s Pets

When clouds of radiation began streaming into the air around the Fukushima nuclear plant, 160,000 residents were told to simply cut and run. However, it seems only 159,998 residents listened. The other two—Naoto Matsumura and Sakae Kato—remained. Evidently, the city possessed not one, but two men whose love of animals cracked through their innate sense […]

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CSU’s Kyle Horton leads NASA study on impact of artificial light on migratory birds

(Colorado State University) The new project will focus on urban areas in the Central Flyway, primarily in the Great Plains. Researchers aim to provide more information on the impact of artificial light on bird behaviors and populations at a large scale.