Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

Brazil

Amazon Tribes Are Excited to Use Drones to Detect Illegal Deforestation in Brazilian Rainforest

Indigenous rights’ groups and WWF International are beginning to train Andean tribes people deep within the Amazon rainforest in the use of drones so that they, as forest-dwelling specialists, can help protect wildlife, and identify, compile evidence for, and report on, illegal logging activities. The WWF teamed up with the Kaninde Ethno-Environmental Defense Association, a […]

The post Amazon Tribes Are Excited to Use Drones to Detect Illegal Deforestation in Brazilian Rainforest appeared first on Good News Network.

Regenerated forests offset 12% of carbon emissions in Brazilian Amazon in 33 years

(Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo) A study quantified the size and age of the forests that grow naturally in degraded and abandoned areas, creating 131 benchmark maps for Brazil. The Amazon has the most restored forests and the Atlantic Rainforest biome has the oldest.

Climate Crisis? IGC Projects Record Harvests For Corn, Wheat And Soybeans

The largest corn harvest in history is among the reasons the International Grains Council (IGC) is forecasting record total grains production in 2020-21. According to the IGC’s Grain Market Review, released Aug. 27, total global grains production will reach 2.230…

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Cognitive elements of language have existed for 40 million years

Humans are not the only beings that can identify rules in complex language-like constructions — monkeys and great apes can do so, too, a new study has shown. Researcher used a series of experiments based on an ‘artificial grammar’ to conclude that this ability can be traced back to our ancient primate ancestors.

Genome sequencing shows climate barrier to spread of Africanized bees

Since the 1950s, ‘Africanized’ honeybees have spread north and south across the Americas until apparently coming to a halt in California and northern Argentina. Now genome sequencing of hundreds of bees from the northern and southern limits shows a gradual decline in African ancestry across hundreds of miles, rather than an abrupt shift.

Newly discovered gene may give ‘sea pickles’ their glow

A new study describes a bioluminescent gene that could be the reason that so-called ‘sea pickles,’ or pyrosomes, an underwater free-floating colony of thousands of tiny animals, reverberate in blue-green light. If confirmed, the finding would be the first bioluminescent gene identified from a chordate — the group that includes all vertebrates as well as a couple types of invertebrates: sea squirts (including pyrosomes) and lancelets.

How global warming might affect food security – The Hindu

Between the year 1870 (the first industrial revolution) and today, the global temperature has risen by almost 2 degrees Celsius. This has come about due to more fossil burning (oil, natural gas, coal), which has also increased the carbon dioxide…

Deep-sea corals reveal secrets of rapid carbon dioxide increase as the last ice age ended

(Boston College) The Southern Ocean played a critical role in the rapid atmospheric carbon dioxide increase during the last deglaciation that took place 20,000 to 10,000 years ago, an international team of researchers report in Science Advances. The chemical signatures of nitrogen and carbon in the coral fossils revealed that ocean carbon sequestration decreased as phytoplankton failed to devour macronutrients supplied by upwelling currents in the Southern Ocean and trap carbon dioxide in the deep ocean.

Monkey study suggests that they, like humans, may have ‘self-domesticated’

Scientists determined that changing an infant monkey’s verbal development also changed a physical marker of domesticity: a patch of white fur on its forehead. This is the first study linking the degree of a social trait with the size of a physical sign of domestication, in any species.