Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

Birds

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Provide shady spots to protect butterflies from climate change

Researchers have discovered significant variations in the ability of different UK butterfly species to maintain a suitable body temperature. Species that rely most on finding a suitably shady location to keep cool are at the greatest risk of population decline. The results predict how climate change might impact butterfly communities, and will inform conservation strategies to protect them.

URI grad student finds PFAS in seabirds from Narragansett Bay, Massachusetts Bay, Cape Fear

(University of Rhode Island) A recent study by a University of Rhode Island graduate student researching PFAS exposure found high levels of the compounds in seabirds from offshore Massachusetts and coastal Rhode Island and North Carolina adding to the accumulating pile of evidence related to human and animal exposure to these chemical compounds.

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‘Save me Seymour!’

(Curtin University) New international research led by Curtin University has found approximately a quarter of carnivorous plant species across the world may be at risk of extinction due to global climate change, illegal poaching, and the clearing of land for agriculture, mining and development.

Animals lose fear of predators rapidly after they start encountering humans

Most wild animals show a suite of predator avoidance behaviors such as vigilance, freezing, and fleeing. But these are quickly reduced after the animals come into contact with humans through captivity, domestication, or urbanization, according to a new study.

Wild birds as offerings to the Egyptian gods

Millions of mummified ibis and birds of prey, sacrificed to the Egyptian gods Horus, Ra or Thoth, have been discovered in the necropolises of the Nile Valley. Such a quantity of mummified birds raises the question of their origin: were they bred, like cats, or were they hunted? According to a team of scientists that carried out extensive geochemical analyses on mummies, they were wild birds.

Computational study of famous fossil reveals evolution of locomotion in ‘ruling reptiles’

Scientists used three-dimensional computer modelling to investigate the hindlimb of Euparkeria capensis — a small reptile that lived in the Triassic Period 245 million years ago — and inferred that it had a ‘mosaic’ of functions in locomotion.

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Bird beak revealed by laser imaging informs early beak function and development

Confuciusornis was a crow-like fossil bird that lived in the Cretaceous ~120 million years ago. It was one of the first birds to evolve a beak. Early beak evolution remains understudied. Using an imaging technique called Laser-Stimulated Fluorescence, researchers address this by revealing just how different the beak and jaw of Confuciusornis were compared to birds we see today.

Bird beak revealed by laser imaging informs early beak function and development

Confuciusornis was a crow-like fossil bird that lived in the Cretaceous ~120 million years ago. It was one of the first birds to evolve a beak. Early beak evolution remains understudied. Using an imaging technique called Laser-Stimulated Fluorescence, researchers address this by revealing just how different the beak and jaw of Confuciusornis were compared to birds we see today.

Hanoi Jane’s Logic For Green New Deal: Birds Are ‘Dive-Bombing Dead’

For someone as infamous as Hanoi Jane Fonda to exploit the devastating West Coast wildfires to sell the Green New Deal (GND) is just par for the course. She’s used to pushing propaganda. Fonda joined MSNBC blowhard Joy Reid on…

How researchers look at the bird brain in action

How do birds make decisions and which brain regions are particularly active when they solve tasks? Researchers are investigating these questions. So far, only anesthetized birds and therefore passive experiments could be examined using the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Thus, the examination of brain processes during active tasks was not possible. Now the researchers have constructed an experimental set-up which allows them to carry out fMRI examinations on awake pigeons and thus also investigate cognitive processes for the first time.