Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

Birds

First map of bee species around the globe

There are over 20,000 species of bee, but accurate data about how these species are spread across the globe are sparse. However, researchers have now created a map of bee diversity by combining the most complete global checklist of known bee species with the almost 6 million additional public records of where individual species have appeared around the world.

Vertebrate biodiversity: A glimmer of hope

A team of biologists found that the picture of dramatically declining vertebrate populations of all kinds is driven by a small number of outlier populations whose numbers are dropping at extreme rates. Once these outliers are separated from the mix, a very different and far more hopeful picture of global biodiversity emerges.

Health trade-offs for wildlife as urbanization expands

City living appears to improve reproductive success for migratory tree swallows compared to breeding in more environmentally protected areas, a new five-year study suggests. But urban life comes with a big trade-off – health hazards linked to poorer water quality.

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Britain Helps World’s Most Remote Inhabited Islands to Establish Biggest Marine Sanctuary in the Atlantic

Centered around the small archipelago of Tristan da Cunha in the Southern Atlantic, governments and ecological organizations have created the fourth-largest marine protected area on Earth, and the largest in the Atlantic Ocean. Spanning 265,347 square miles, Tristan da Cunha is almost three times as big as the island of Great Britain, and will protect […]

The post Britain Helps World’s Most Remote Inhabited Islands to Establish Biggest Marine Sanctuary in the Atlantic appeared first on Good News Network.

Uncategorized

Britain Helps World’s Most Remote Inhabited Islands to Establish Biggest Marine Sanctuary in the Atlantic

Centered around the small archipelago of Tristan da Cunha in the Southern Atlantic, governments and ecological organizations have created the fourth-largest marine protected area on Earth, and the largest in the Atlantic Ocean. Spanning 265,347 square miles, Tristan da Cunha is almost three times as big as the island of Great Britain, and will protect […]

The post Britain Helps World’s Most Remote Inhabited Islands to Establish Biggest Marine Sanctuary in the Atlantic appeared first on Good News Network.

Britain Helps World’s Most Remote Inhabited Islands to Establish Biggest Marine Sanctuary in the Atlantic

Centered around the small archipelago of Tristan da Cunha in the Southern Atlantic, governments and ecological organizations have created the fourth-largest marine protected area on Earth, and the largest in the Atlantic Ocean. Spanning 265,347 square miles, Tristan da Cunha is almost three times as big as the island of Great Britain, and will protect […]

The post Britain Helps World’s Most Remote Inhabited Islands to Establish Biggest Marine Sanctuary in the Atlantic appeared first on Good News Network.

Henderson island fossils reveal new Polynesian sandpiper species

(Canterbury Museum) Fossil bones collected in the early 1990s on Henderson Island, part of the Pitcairn Group, have revealed a new species of Polynesian sandpiper. The Henderson Sandpiper, a small wading bird that has been extinct for centuries, is formally named Prosobonia sauli after Cook Islands-based ornithologist and conservationist Edward K Saul.

In a warming climate, can birds take the heat?

We don’t know precisely how hot things will get as climate change marches on, but animals in the tropics may not fare as well as their temperate relatives. Many scientists think tropical animals, because they’re accustomed to a more stable thermal environment, may be pushed beyond their limits quickly as temperatures soar. Yet researchers show both temperate and tropical birds can handle acute heat stress better than expected.

Scientists release genomes of birds representing nearly all avian families

Scientists report on the genomes of 363 species of birds, including 267 that have been sequenced for the first time. The studied species represent more than 92 percent of the world’s avian families. The data from the study will advance research on the evolution of birds and the conservation of threatened bird species.