Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

Birds

Clue to killer whale cluster

(Flinders University) A Flinders University researcher has finally fathomed why large numbers of killer whales gather at a single main location off the Western Australian southern coastline every summer. In a new paper published in Deep Sea Research, physical oceanographer Associate Professor Jochen Kampf describes the conditions which have produced this ecological natural wonder of orcas migrating to the continental slope near Bremer Bay in the western Great Australian Bight from late austral spring to early autumn (January-April).

Joe Biden’s Offshore Wind Energy Mirage

President Biden recently announced ambitious plans to install huge offshore industrial wind facilities along America’s Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico, and Pacific coasts. His goal is to churn out 30 gigawatts (30,000 megawatts) of wind capacity by 2030, ensuring the U.S….

What can a dinosaur’s inner ear tell us? Just listen

(Yale University) New Haven, Conn. — If paleontologists had a wish list, it would almost certainly include insights into two particular phenomena: how dinosaurs interacted with each other and how they began to fly.

Bornean rajah scops owl rediscovered after 125 years

(Smithsonian National Zoological Park) The Bornean subspecies of Rajah scops owl (Otus brookii brookii), documented in the wild for the first time since 1892, may be its own unique species and deserving of a conservation designation. Published April 28 in The Wilson Journal of Ornithology, Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center ecologist Andy Boyce reported the rediscovery and photographed this elusive subspecies in the mountainous forests of Mount Kinabalu in Sabah, Malaysia.

Flatfish got weird fast due to evolutionary cascade

(Rice University) Flatfishes rapidly evolved into the most asymmetric vertebrates by changing multiple traits at once, according to a new Rice University study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

SeasonWatch Is an Indian Initiative to Track Climate Change by Observing Trees – Gadgets 360

The neem tree growing outside my house is a shape-shifter. Every year, without fail, in the cool dry winter its leaves become tired and yellow-brown, and sometimes fall off completely. Just as the weather turns a bit warmer, heralding the…

NSU researcher part of a flagship study on vertebrate genomes

(Nova Southeastern University) Today, the G10K sponsored Vertebrate Genomes Project (VGP) announces their flagship study and associated publications focused on genome assembly quality and standardization for the field of genomics. This study includes 16 diploid high-quality, near error-free, and near complete vertebrate reference genome assemblies for species across all taxa with backbones (i.e., mammals, amphibians, birds, reptiles, and fishes) from five years of piloting the first phase of the VGP project.

Was North America populated by ‘stepping stone’ migration across Bering Sea?

(University of Kansas) A new study from the University of Kansas just published in the open-access journal Comptes Rendus Geoscience, may answer “one of the greatest mysteries of our time . . . when humans made the first bold journey to the Americas.”

Researcher questions whether powered flight appeared on non-avialan dinosaurs

(University of Malaga) “Birds are a group of dinosaurs of which we have discovered 150-million-year-old fossils with fully developed wings. Among their closest non-avialan relatives, we have also found fossils with sufficiently developed wings that could provide them with some aerodynamic benefit, whether to glide between trees or get thrust to climb and jump over obstacles. But this does not mean that they could take off by flapping their wings or maintain a powered flight”, explains Francisco Serrano.