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Climate Change Resilience: Northern Red Sea Corals Pass Heat Stress Test With Flying Colors – SciTechDaily

The aquarium system in which scientists submitted Northern red sea corals to various temperatures. Credit: Maoz Fine EPFL scientists are beginning to understand why corals in the Gulf of Aqaba, along with their symbiotic algae and bacteria, resist higher temperatures…

With bacteria against coral bleaching

(Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)) Coral bleaching, which is becoming stronger and more frequent due to heat stress, has already wiped out corals at many locations globally. With the help of a microbiome-targeting strategy developed by an international team led by GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, it could become feasible to help protect corals from heat stress.

Strange isotopes: Scientists explain a methane isotope paradox of the seafloor

(Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology) Deep down in the seafloor anaerobic microbes consume large amounts of methane, a potent greenhouse gas. Even though this process is a crucial element of the global carbon cycle, it is still poorly understood. Scientists from Bremen and Israel now found the solution to a long-standing enigma in this process: why methane carbon isotopes behave so differently than expected. In a joint effort with their colleagues they present the answer in the journal Science Advances.

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When Is the Right Time to Start Your Backyard Composter?

Vermont became the first state to mandate composting of food scraps. While this was the first state-wide mandate, there are cities across the U.S. that have also discussed or implemented laws requiring food waste to go into composters instead of the trash. California is set to start its mandatory food waste composting requirement in 2022. You’ve […]

Tick-Borne Infection Immune to Most Antibiotics May Be Blocked Using Special ‘Nanobodies’

Tiny molecules called nanobodies, which can be designed to mimic antibody structures and functions, may be the key to blocking a tick-borne bacterial infection that remains out of reach of almost all antibiotics, new research suggests. The infection is called human monocytic ehrlichiosis (HME), and is one of the most prevalent and potentially life-threatening tick-borne […]

The post Tick-Borne Infection Immune to Most Antibiotics May Be Blocked Using Special ‘Nanobodies’ appeared first on Good News Network.

Scientists Make Microplastics Breakthrough, Devising Method to Trap And Remove Them

Microbiologists have found a way to use bacteria to trap microplastics, removing them from the environment and making them easier to recycle. The new technique, developed by scientists at Hong Kong Polytechnic University, uses bacterial biofilms—a sticky substance created by micro-organisms—to trap microplastic particles. The biofilm is then processed and dispersed, releasing the microplastic particles […]

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New view of species interactions offers clues to preserve threatened ecosystems

(University of California – San Diego) Scientists from around the world have produced a new analysis–believed to be the most detailed study of specialized ecological data from global forests–that is furthering science’s understanding of species interactions and how diversity contributes to the preservation of ecosystem health.

Wisdom and Loneliness May Be Shaped by Healthy Gut Microbes, Researchers Believe

The evolving science of wisdom rests on the idea that wisdom’s defined traits correspond to distinct regions of the brain, and that greater wisdom translates into greater happiness and life satisfaction while being less wise results in opposite, negative consequences. Scientists have found in multiple studies that persons deemed to be wiser are less prone […]

The post Wisdom and Loneliness May Be Shaped by Healthy Gut Microbes, Researchers Believe appeared first on Good News Network.

UNH research: Climate change affects deep-sea corals and sponges differently

(University of New Hampshire) Corals and sponges are important foundations in ocean ecosystems providing structure and habitats that shelter a high number of species like fish, crabs and other creatures, particularly in the seamounts and canyons of the deep sea. Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have discovered that when it comes to climate change not all deep-sea corals and sponges are affected the same and some could be threatened if average ocean temperatures continue to increase in the deep sea of the Northwest Atlantic.