Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

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Another Month Gone, Another Month Entering the Global Warming Record Books – Discover Magazine

The first of several monthly analyses of the global climate is now in, and it’s not much of a surprise: Last month finished in a virtual tie for warmest June on record. The analysis, from the Copernicus Climate Change Service…

Global e-waste surging: Up 21% in 5 years

(Terry Collins Assoc) The UN’s 3rd Global eWaste Monitor reports 53.6 million metric tonnes (Mt) of e-waste was produced last year — substantially more than the weight of all adults in Europe. Global e-waste has risen 21% by weight in just five years, fueled by higher consumption rates of electric and electronic equipment, short life cycles, and few repair options. In 2030 the world is projected to produce about 50% more e-waste per capita compared with 2014.

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Soap bubbles pollinated a pear orchard without damaging delicate flowers

Soap bubbles facilitated the pollination of a pear orchard by delivering pollen grains to targeted flowers, demonstrating that this whimsical technique can successfully pollinate fruit-bearing plants. The study suggests that soap bubbles may present a low-tech complement to robotic pollination technology designed to supplement the work of vanishing bees.

Why Nuclear Power Is Crucial To Our National Security

The world is facing a time of great uncertainty. Amidst a pandemic, a global recession, and immense civil unrest, we are seeing global democracy also come under attack. China is using the current state of the world as an opportunity…

Mangroves at risk if carbon emissions not reduced by 2050, international scientists predict

(Nanyang Technological University) Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore), and an international research team have predicted that by 2050, mangroves will not be able to survive rising sea-levels if global carbon emissions are not reduced.

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Antarctic ice sheets capable of retreating up to 50 meters per day

The ice shelves surrounding the Antarctic coastline retreated at speeds of up to 50 meters per day at the end of the last Ice Age, far more rapid than the satellite-derived retreat rates observed today, new research has found.

Delicate seafloor ridges reveal the rapid retreat of past Antarctic ice

(American Association for the Advancement of Science) Detailed seafloor mapping of submerged glacial landforms finds that Antarctic ice sheets in the past retreated far faster than the most rapid pace of retreat observed today, exceeding even the most extreme modern rates by at least an order of magnitude, according to a new study.