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News about Climate Change and our Planet

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How to stop global warming? The most controversial solutions explained – Eco-Business

Depending on who you ask, geoengineering is either a threat to serious climate action, a faraway back-up plan or a necessary part of today’s climate policy. All would likely agree it is contentious. Geoengineering encompasses a broad spectrum of proposed…

China’s Clean Air Push Could Be Contributing To Global Warming – OilPrice.com

China’s Clean Air Push Could Be Contributing To Global Warming | OilPrice.com Tsvetana Paraskova Tsvetana is a writer for Oilprice.com with over a decade of experience writing for news outlets such as iNVEZZ and SeeNews.  More Info Premium Content By…

Greenland is on track to lose ice faster than in any century over 12,000 years

If human societies don’t sharply curb emissions of greenhouse gases, Greenland’s rate of ice loss this century is likely to greatly outpace that of any century over the past 12,000 years, a new study concludes. Scientists say the results reiterate the need for countries around the world to take action now to reduce emissions, slow the decline of ice sheets, and mitigate sea level rise.

Advancing carbon dioxide catalysis

(University of Delaware) Feng Jiao is a leader in the field of carbon capture and utilization, working on ways to subtract carbon dioxide from the atmosphere by capturing the greenhouse gas and transforming it into another substance altogether. And now he’s received two major Department of Energy grants, totaling $3.5 million, to advance those efforts.

Mixing of the planet’s ocean waters is slowing down, speeding up global warming, study finds – Washington Post

The reduced up and down mixing is expected to have sweeping implications beyond just accelerating global warming. It is projected to increase energy available to hurricanes and other storms, reduce essential nutrients for fish in upper ocean layers and diminish…

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Lessons from a cooling climate

Usually, talk of carbon sequestration focuses on plants: forests storing carbon in the trunks of massive trees, algae blooming and sinking to the seabed, or perhaps peatlands locking carbon away for tens of thousands of years. While it’s true that plants take up large amounts of carbon from the atmosphere, the rocks themselves mediate a great deal of the carbon cycle over geological timescales. Processes like volcano eruptions, mountain building and erosion are responsible for moving carbon through Earth’s atmosphere, surface and mantle.

Lessons from a cooling climate

Usually, talk of carbon sequestration focuses on plants: forests storing carbon in the trunks of massive trees, algae blooming and sinking to the seabed, or perhaps peatlands locking carbon away for tens of thousands of years. While it’s true that plants take up large amounts of carbon from the atmosphere, the rocks themselves mediate a great deal of the carbon cycle over geological timescales. Processes like volcano eruptions, mountain building and erosion are responsible for moving carbon through Earth’s atmosphere, surface and mantle.

Redefining drought in the US corn belt

(University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences) As the climate trends warmer and drier, global food security increasingly hinges on crops’ ability to withstand drought. But are scientists and producers focusing on the right metric when measuring crop-relevant drought? Not exactly, according to new research from University of Illinois scientists, who urge the scientific community to redefine the term.