Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

Asia

‘No Planet B’: Hundreds of thousands join global climate strike – Al Jazeera English

School students in Sydney join the Global Strike 4 Climate rally; a global day of protest to demand governments take urgent steps to prevent environmental disaster [Steven Saphore/AAP Images via AP Photo] Hundreds of thousands of protesters, many of them…

The human imperative of stabilizing global climate change at 1.5°C – Science Magazine

The need to stabilize global climate Climate change will be the greatest threat to humanity and global ecosystems in the coming years, and there is a pressing need to understand and communicate the impacts of warming, across the perspectives of…

Why Russia is ambivalent about global warming – The Economist

FIRST CAME fires that turned the Siberian skies into a wall of solid smoke stretching for thousands of kilometres. Then came a drought that sucked the Lena river nearly dry, leaving boats marooned in the mud. It has been an…

Cutting air pollution would not cause ‘near-term spike’ in global warming – Carbon Brief

A reduction in air pollution brought about by shifting away from fossil fuels would not inadvertently cause a short-term acceleration of global warming, a new study says. Earlier modelling work using scenarios where fossil-fuel burning ends instantaneously had suggested that…

Earth's ozone layer still in trouble, study finds

We’ve got good news and bad news. There’s more evidence that the hole in the ozone layer over Antarctica is recovering and that humans’ efforts are making a difference. At the same time, however, one study suggests the ozone layer…

Carp aquaculture in Neolithic China dating back 8,000 years

Researchers analyzed fish bones excavated from the Early Neolithic Jiahu site in Henan Province, China. By comparing the body-length distributions and species-composition ratios of the bones with findings from East Asian sites with present aquaculture, the researchers provide evidence of managed carp aquaculture at Jiahu dating back to 6200-5700 BC.

New study shows common carp aquaculture in Neolithic China dating back 8,000 years

(Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History) In a recent study, an international team of researchers analyzed fish bones excavated from the Early Neolithic Jiahu site in Henan Province, China. By comparing the body-length distributions and species-composition ratios of the bones with findings from East Asian sites with present aquaculture, the researchers provide evidence of managed carp aquaculture at Jiahu dating back to 6200-5700 BC.

Hiding in plain sight

(Washington University in St. Louis) Early rice growers unwittingly gave barnyard grass a big hand, helping to give root to a rice imitator that is now considered one of the world’s worst agricultural weeds. The new research from biologist Kenneth Olsen in Arts & Sciences is published this week in Nature Ecology & Evolution.