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Climate Change May Have Pushed Ancient Humans Into Extinction – Now. Powered by – Now. Powered by Northrop Grumman.

Throughout Earth’s history, climate change has pushed animal and plant species into extinction. About 250 million years ago, global warming triggered by massive volcanic eruptions wiped out 96 percent of all marine species during the Permian period, as Science magazine…

U.S. Donation Kicks Off Landmine Clearing in One of the Largest Conservation Areas in the World

A new project to demine seven million square meters of land, including a critical area inside the largest contiguous wildlife area in the world, is underway, thanks to a grant from the U.S. Government. Removing the landmines laid four decades ago will help protect African species such as elephants, pangolins, and lions in a wildlife […]

The post U.S. Donation Kicks Off Landmine Clearing in One of the Largest Conservation Areas in the World appeared first on Good News Network.

Clue to killer whale cluster

(Flinders University) A Flinders University researcher has finally fathomed why large numbers of killer whales gather at a single main location off the Western Australian southern coastline every summer. In a new paper published in Deep Sea Research, physical oceanographer Associate Professor Jochen Kampf describes the conditions which have produced this ecological natural wonder of orcas migrating to the continental slope near Bremer Bay in the western Great Australian Bight from late austral spring to early autumn (January-April).

New low-cost solutions could save sea turtles from a climate change-induced sex crisis | TheHill – The Hill

Because of global warming, most newborn sea turtles are female, which could put their long-term survival at risk. New research reveals that in addition to more widely used techniques such as shading and irrigation, the splitting of the turtle nests,…

Biodiversity loss in warming oceans | Stanford News – Stanford University News

A fossil study from Stanford University suggests the diversity of life in the world’s oceans declined time and again over the past 145 million years during periods of extreme warming. Many other factors are also expected to negatively impact habitat…

Global warming causes depletion in biodiversity: Study – Zee News

Washington: New research by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln suggests that temperature can largely explain why the greatest variety of aquatic life resides in the tropics but also why it has not always and, amid record-fast global warming, soon may not…

Study indicates global warming could reduce biodiversity in tropics – Times of India

WASHINGTON: New research by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln suggests that temperature can largely explain why the greatest variety of aquatic life resides in the tropics but also why it has not always and, amid record-fast global warming, soon may not…

Study indicates global warming could reduce biodiversity in tropics – ANI News

Washington [US], May 7 (ANI): New research by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln suggests that temperature can largely explain why the greatest variety of aquatic life resides in the tropics but also why it has not always and, amid record-fast global…

New study explores functionality in aquatic ecosystems

(Universität Bayreuth) The functions of water-dominated ecosystems can be considerably influenced and changed by hydrological fluctuation. The varying states of redox-active substances are of crucial importance here. Researchers at the University of Bayreuth have discovered this, in cooperation with partners from the Universities of Tübingen and Bristol and the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Halle-Leipzig.

Global Warming, Development Could Bring Vampire Bats to Florida – WMFE

Vampire bats could soon make their way into the United States from Mexico due to climate change and development, scientists say. The possibility of a migration is concerning federal agriculture officials because the bats like to feast on the blood…