Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

Animals

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A ‘regime shift’ is happening in the Arctic Ocean

Scientists find the growth of phytoplankton in the Arctic Ocean has increased 57 percent over just two decades, enhancing its ability to soak up carbon dioxide. While once linked to melting sea ice, the increase is now propelled by rising concentrations of tiny algae.

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Bats offer clues to treating COVID-19

Bats carry many viruses, including COVID-19, without becoming ill. Biologists are studying the immune system of bats to find potential ways to ‘mimic’ that system in humans.

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Bats offer clues to treating COVID-19

Bats carry many viruses, including COVID-19, without becoming ill. Biologists are studying the immune system of bats to find potential ways to ‘mimic’ that system in humans.

Uncategorized

Care for cats? So did people along the Silk Road more than 1,000 years ago

Common domestic cats, as we know them today, might have accompanied Kazakh pastoralists as pets more than 1,000 years ago. This is indicated by new analyses done on an almost complete cat skeleton found during an excavation along the former Silk Road in southern Kazakhstan. An international research team has reconstructed the cat’s life, revealing astonishing insights into the relationship between humans and pets at the time.

Advanced technology sheds new light on evolution of teeth

(Uppsala University) The evolution of our teeth began among ancient armoured fishes more than 400 million years ago. In the scientific journal Science, an international team led by researchers from Uppsala University presents ground-breaking findings about these earliest jawed vertebrates. Using powerful X-ray imaging, they show that unique fossils found near Prague contain surprisingly modern-looking teeth.

Biologists trace plants’ steady mitochondrial genomes to a gene found in viruses, bacteria

(Colorado State University) CSU biologists have traced the stability of plant mitochondrial genomes to a particular gene – MSH1 – that plants have but animals don’t. Their experiments, described in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could lend insight into why animal mitochondrial genomes tend to mutate.

Where did the Asian longhorned ticks in the US come from?

The invasive population of Asian longhorned ticks in the United States likely began with three or more self-cloning females from northeastern Asia, according to a new study. Asian longhorned ticks outside the U.S. can carry debilitating diseases. In the United States and elsewhere they can threaten livestock and pets. The new study sheds new light on the origin of these exotic ticks and how they are spreading across the United States.