Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

Americas

Clovis people: Narrow window of tool-making

There is much debate surrounding the age of the Clovis — a prehistoric culture named for stone tools found near Clovis, New Mexico in the early 1930s — who once occupied North America during the end of the last Ice Age. New testing of bones and artifacts show that Clovis tools were made only during a brief, 300-year period from 13,050 to 12,750 years ago.

Genome sequencing shows climate barrier to spread of Africanized bees

Since the 1950s, ‘Africanized’ honeybees have spread north and south across the Americas until apparently coming to a halt in California and northern Argentina. Now genome sequencing of hundreds of bees from the northern and southern limits shows a gradual decline in African ancestry across hundreds of miles, rather than an abrupt shift.

A renewable solution to keep cool in a warming world

(International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis) Month-on-month, year-on-year, the world continues to experience record high temperatures. In response to this and exacerbated by a growing global population, it is expected that air-conditioning demand will continue to rise. A new IIASA-led study explored the pros and cons of seawater air-conditioning as an alternative cooling solution.

How leaves reflect light reveals evolutionary history of seed plants

The way leaves reflect light, known as plant reflectance spectra, can illuminate the evolutionary history of seed plants, according to researchers. The researchers found that by measuring the light spectrum reflected by leaves, they can identify the plant and its chemistry, evolution and place in the tree of life.

Achieving clean air for all is possible

(International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis) Air pollution is currently the largest environmental risk factor for human health globally and can be linked to several million cases of premature deaths every year. A new study however shows that it is possible to achieve clean air worldwide with fundamental transformations of today’s practices in many sectors, supported by strong political will.

How Zika virus degrades essential protein for neurological development via autophagy

Researchers shed new light on how Zika virus hijacks our own cellular machinery to break down an essential protein for neurological development, getting it to ‘eat itself’. By triggering this process known as autophagy, Zika virus is able to degrade an important protein, a process that may contribute to the development of neurological or brain deficiencies and congenital birth defects in the newborns of infected pregnant women.