Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

Alaska

Media tip sheet: Ecological forecasting

(Ecological Society of America) These presentations feature research that attempts to forecast ecosystems of the future. All will be presented at the Ecological Society of America’s upcoming virtual annual meeting, August 3-6, 2020.

Another Month Gone, Another Month Entering the Global Warming Record Books – Discover Magazine

The first of several monthly analyses of the global climate is now in, and it’s not much of a surprise: Last month finished in a virtual tie for warmest June on record. The analysis, from the Copernicus Climate Change Service…

Covid-19 and climate change: Why we need to remember what we’ve lost – Vox.com

For as long as I’ve followed global warming, advocates and activists have shared a certain faith: When the impacts get really bad, people will act. Maybe it will be an especially destructive hurricane, heat wave, or flood. Maybe it will…

In the Arctic, spring snowmelt triggers fresh CO2 production

(San Diego State University) Studies have shown the Arctic is warming roughly twice as fast as the rest of the world, and its soil holds twice the amount of carbon dioxide as the atmosphere. New research from San Diego State University finds that water from spring snowmelt infiltrates the soil and triggers fresh carbon dioxide production at higher rates than previously assumed.

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Beavers gnawing away at the permafrost

Alaska’s beavers are profiting from climate change, and spreading rapidly. In just a few years’ time, they have not only expanded into many tundra regions where they’d never been seen before; they’re also building more and more dams in their new homes, creating a host of new water bodies.

Uncategorized

Beavers gnawing away at the permafrost

Alaska’s beavers are profiting from climate change, and spreading rapidly. In just a few years’ time, they have not only expanded into many tundra regions where they’d never been seen before; they’re also building more and more dams in their new homes, creating a host of new water bodies.

Researchers look for answers as to why western bumblebees are declining

(University of Wyoming) The decline of the Western bumblebee is likely not limited to one culprit but, instead, due to several factors that interact such as pesticides, pathogens, climate change and habitat loss.