Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

Aid

No, Hurricanes Are Not Bigger, Stronger And More Dangerous

Earlier this week a paper published by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) by a team of authors led by Aslak Grinsted, a scientist who studies ice sheets at the University of Copenhagen, claimed that “the frequency…

Why some foods 'taste too good' to stop eating

It sounds like a mass conspiracy at first: food companies have figured out a way to manufacture foods that are just the right amount of sweet, salty or fatty — and now we can’t stop eating them. Unfortunately, it’s not…

No, Venice Isn’t Flooding Due To Climate Change

Venice is flooded – again – and the mayor Luigi Brugnaro is blaming climate change. This has become the standard dog-ate-my-homework excuse for desperate politicians and administrators who want to dodge their responsibilities while simultaneously attracting media sympathy and aid money….

Mosquito nets: Are they catching more fishes than insects?

(Stockholm University) Mosquito nets designed to prevent malaria transmission are used for fishing which may devastate tropical coastal ecosystems, according to a new scientific study. The researchers found that most of the fish caught using mosquito nets were smaller than a finger and potentially collect hundreds of individuals.

Photosynthesis seen in a new light by rapid X-ray pulses

(Arizona State University) In a new study, led by Petra Fromme and Nadia Zatsepin at the Biodesign Center for Applied Structural Discovery, the School of Molecular Sciences and the Department of Physics at ASU, researchers investigated the structure of Photosystem I (PSI) with ultrashort X-ray pulses at the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (EuXFEL), located in Hamburg, Germany.

Solar and wind energy preserve groundwater for drought, agriculture

(Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs) A Princeton University-led study in Nature Communications is among the first to show that solar and wind energy not only enhance drought resilience, but also aid in groundwater sustainability. They used California as a case study.

Uncategorized

Changes in high-altitude winds over the South Pacific produce long-term effects

In the past million years, the high-altitude winds of the southern westerly wind belt, which spans nearly half the globe, didn’t behave as uniformly over the Southern Pacific as previously assumed. Instead, they varied cyclically over periods of ca. 21,000 years. A new study has now confirmed close ties between the climate of the mid and high latitudes and that of the tropics in the South Pacific.

Culturing primate embryos to learn more about human development

Little is known about the molecular and cellular events that occur during early embryonic development in primate species. Now, scientists have created a method to allow primate embryos to grow in the laboratory longer than ever before, enabling the researchers to obtain molecular details of key developmental processes for the first time. This research, while done in nonhuman primate cells, can have direct implications for early human development.

Uncategorized

Tiny swimming donuts deliver the goods

Bacteria and other swimming microorganisms evolved to thrive in challenging environments, and researchers struggle to mimic their unique abilities for biomedical technologies, but fabrication challenges created a manufacturing bottleneck. Microscopic, 3D-printed, tori — donuts ­­– coated with nickel and platinum may bridge the gap between biological and synthetic swimmers, according to an international team of researchers.