Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

Adaptation

Seabird response to abrupt climate change 5,000 years ago transformed Falklands ecosystems

A 14,000-year paleoecological reconstruction of the sub-Antarctic islands has found that seabird establishment occurred during a period of regional cooling 5,000 years ago. Their populations, in turn, shifted the Falkland Islands ecosystems through the deposit of high concentrations of guano that helped nourish tussac, produce peat and increase the incidence of fire.

Clovis people: Narrow window of tool-making

There is much debate surrounding the age of the Clovis — a prehistoric culture named for stone tools found near Clovis, New Mexico in the early 1930s — who once occupied North America during the end of the last Ice Age. New testing of bones and artifacts show that Clovis tools were made only during a brief, 300-year period from 13,050 to 12,750 years ago.

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ADAPTATION: Sand shortages expose beaches to rising seas

Coastal counties across the southeastern U.S. face “critical sand shortages” for projects that replenish beaches as climate change intensifies storms and raises sea levels, according to the Army Corps of Engineers.

Where will the seabirds go?

(Lehigh University) A new study of a 14,000-year record, published in Science Advances, shows that seabird poop transformed an entire ecosystem in the Falkland Islands, raising questions about the birds’ survival and the potential impact of climate change on sensitive terrestrial-marine ecosystems

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Where will the seabirds go?

(Lehigh University) A new study of a 14,000-year record, published in Science Advances, shows that seabird poop transformed an entire ecosystem in the Falkland Islands, raising questions about the birds’ survival and the potential impact of climate change on sensitive terrestrial-marine ecosystems

Protected areas help waterbirds adapt to climate change

Climate change pushes species distribution areas northward. However, the expansion of species ranges is not self-evident due to e.g. habitat degradation and unsustainable harvesting caused by human activities. A new study suggests that protected areas can facilitate wintering waterbird adaptation to climate warming by advancing their range shifts towards north.

Oldest securely dated evidence for a river flowing through the Thar Desert, Western India

(Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History) Using luminescence dating of ancient river sediments, a new study published in Quaternary Science Reviews presents evidence for river activity at Nal Quarry in the central Thar Desert starting from approx. 173 thousand years ago. These findings represent the oldest directly dated phase of river activity in the region and indicate Stone Age populations lived in a distinctly different Thar Desert landscape than we encounter today.

How leaves reflect light reveals evolutionary history of seed plants

The way leaves reflect light, known as plant reflectance spectra, can illuminate the evolutionary history of seed plants, according to researchers. The researchers found that by measuring the light spectrum reflected by leaves, they can identify the plant and its chemistry, evolution and place in the tree of life.

Adapting to 4°C of global warming – GOV.UK – GOV.UK

Before I start my speech, I’d like to add my condolences to the Committee on Climate Change and everyone who knew Professor Dame Georgina Mace. Georgina’s work assessing the impacts of climate change and the effect of adaptation on the…