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Here’s what you need to know about this year’s UN Conference on climate change – KCRA Sacramento

On Friday, the 27th annual United Nations Conference on Climate Change, known as COP 27, came to a close. This year, delegations from nearly 200 countries convened in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, in an effort to encourage action on the intensifying climate crisis. Negotiation between nations focused on ways to implement pledges signed in the Paris Climate Agreement. According to that agreement, participating countries have committed to limiting global warming to 2 degrees Celsius compared to the industrial period benchmark. According to robust climate measurements, Earth has already warmed 1.2 degrees Celsius since that benchmark time period. Meteorologist Bernadette Woods Placky, who attended COP 27, says that the closing window puts a tighter deadline on the need for global change.”We’re already seeing serious impacts from that 1.2 degrees. The raging wildfires, the extreme heat, our challenges to water, and how we grow crops and where we grow crops and how we feed people,” said Woods Placky. “With every tenth of a degree, we see those impacts get worse and start to compound and happen quicker.”Much of the conversation at COP 27 revolved around finding ways to mitigate and adapt to the climate changes that we are already experiencing. But Woods Placky said that the economics of climate change are starting to come to the forefront too. Specifically, countries are trying to find an equitable way to cover the costs being inflicted on poorer nations following climate-related disasters.“A lot of those poorer countries or developing countries haven’t contributed as much to the warming that we’ve experienced, but they’re dealing with the impacts and they don’t have the same early warning system or infrastructure support system to help get them through the changes that they’re seeing,” said Woods Placky. “So there’s this big battle right now on who’s going to pay for it and how.” In 2015, the United States pledged carbon neutrality by the year 2050 as its contribution to the Paris Agreement. Woods Placky said that hitting that goal will require big changes in energy sources, transportation and agriculture, but the signing of this year’s Inflation Reduction Act was a big step towards meeting that goal. California has also made some major climate promises in the last several years, including a statewide goal of carbon neutrality by 2045 and no new gas-powered car sales after 2035. Woods Placky said those efforts plus commitments from every other nation will be needed to lessen the impacts of climate change for future generations. “We have waited so long to tackle the climate crisis that we need everyone. Yes, China has to do its part. Yes, India has to do its part, but so does the United States, so does everyone at this point. We have a lot that we need to change and we have to do it quickly,” Woods Placky said.

On Friday, the 27th annual United Nations Conference on Climate Change, known as COP 27, came to a close.

This year, delegations from nearly 200 countries convened in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, in an effort to encourage action on the intensifying climate crisis.

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Negotiation between nations focused on ways to implement pledges signed in the Paris Climate Agreement. According to that agreement, participating countries have committed to limiting global warming to 2 degrees Celsius compared to the industrial period benchmark.

According to robust climate measurements, Earth has already warmed 1.2 degrees Celsius since that benchmark time period. Meteorologist Bernadette Woods Placky, who attended COP 27, says that the closing window puts a tighter deadline on the need for global change.

We’re already seeing serious impacts from that 1.2 degrees. The raging wildfires, the extreme heat, our challenges to water, and how we grow crops and where we grow crops and how we feed people,” said Woods Placky. “With every tenth of a degree, we see those impacts get worse and start to compound and happen quicker.”

Much of the conversation at COP 27 revolved around finding ways to mitigate and adapt to the climate changes that we are already experiencing. But Woods Placky said that the economics of climate change are starting to come to the forefront too. Specifically, countries are trying to find an equitable way to cover the costs being inflicted on poorer nations following climate-related disasters.

“A lot of those poorer countries or developing countries haven’t contributed as much to the warming that we’ve experienced, but they’re dealing with the impacts and they don’t have the same early warning system or infrastructure support system to help get them through the changes that they’re seeing,” said Woods Placky. “So there’s this big battle right now on who’s going to pay for it and how.”

In 2015, the United States pledged carbon neutrality by the year 2050 as its contribution to the Paris Agreement. Woods Placky said that hitting that goal will require big changes in energy sources, transportation and agriculture, but the signing of this year’s Inflation Reduction Act was a big step towards meeting that goal.

California has also made some major climate promises in the last several years, including a statewide goal of carbon neutrality by 2045 and no new gas-powered car sales after 2035.

Woods Placky said those efforts plus commitments from every other nation will be needed to lessen the impacts of climate change for future generations.

“We have waited so long to tackle the climate crisis that we need everyone. Yes, China has to do its part. Yes, India has to do its part, but so does the United States, so does everyone at this point. We have a lot that we need to change and we have to do it quickly,” Woods Placky said.

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