Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

Month: November 2020

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Editorial: Biden’s challenge: Restoring the U.S. as a leader against global warming – Boulder Daily Camera

By The Los Angeles Times The election of Joe Biden as president signals a return to sanity in the federal government’s approach to climate change. For starters, Biden at least recognizes the severity of global warming’s impact on the people who are…

Brazil Amazon Deforestation Hits 12-Year High Under Bolsonaro

The scale of deforestation in Brazil’s Amazon rainforest surged to a 12-year high in 2020, official government data showed on Monday, with destruction soaring since President Jair Bolsonaro took office and weakened environmental enforcement. In 2020, destruction of the world’s…

Microfluidic system with cell-separating powers may unravel how novel pathogens attack

To develop effective therapeutics against pathogens, scientists need to first uncover how they attack host cells. An efficient way to conduct these investigations on an extensive scale is through high-speed screening tests called assays.

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Microfluidic system with cell-separating powers may unravel how novel pathogens attack

To develop effective therapeutics against pathogens, scientists need to first uncover how they attack host cells. An efficient way to conduct these investigations on an extensive scale is through high-speed screening tests called assays.

Researchers explore population size, density in rise of centralized power in antiquity

A group of researchers developed Power Theory, a model emphasizing the role of demography in political centralization, and applied it to the shift in power dynamics in prehistoric northern coastal societies in Peru. To test the theory, the team created a summed probability distribution (SPD) from 755 radiocarbon dates from 10,000-1,000 B.P. Researchers found a correlation between the tenets of Power Theory and power structure changes in early Peruvian societies.

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The ‘smell’ of coral as an indicator of reef health

A study conducted in the southern Great Barrier Reef reveals the chemical diversity of emissions from healthy corals. The researchers found that across the reef-building coral species studied on Heron Island, the abundance and chemical diversity of their gas emissions fell significantly during heat stress experiments. With the increasing frequency of heat stress events, understanding coral emissions may prove to be a key reef conservation tool.

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The ‘smell’ of coral as an indicator of reef health

A study conducted in the southern Great Barrier Reef reveals the chemical diversity of emissions from healthy corals. The researchers found that across the reef-building coral species studied on Heron Island, the abundance and chemical diversity of their gas emissions fell significantly during heat stress experiments. With the increasing frequency of heat stress events, understanding coral emissions may prove to be a key reef conservation tool.

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Fingerprints’ moisture-regulating mechanism strengthens human touch

Human fingerprints have a self-regulating moisture mechanism that not only helps us to avoid dropping our smartphone, but could help scientists to develop better prosthetic limbs, robotic equipment and virtual reality environments, a new study reveals.

The wily octopus: King of flexibility

Octopuses have the most flexible appendages known in nature, according to a new study. In addition to being soft and strong, each of the animal’s eight arms can bend, twist, elongate and shorten in many combinations to produce diverse movements. Researchers filmed 10 octopuses over many months while presenting them with a variety of challenges, and recorded 16,563 examples of these arm movements.