Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

Month: August 2018

The once-thickest Arctic sea ice has gone

The image below shows Arctic sea ice north of Greenland and around Ellesmere Island. This is the area where for thousands of years the sea ice has been the thickest, in many places remaining thicker than 5 meters (16.4 ft)…

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Zucchini Pickles with Rosemary and Sage(Paleo, Vegan, Gluten Free)

Zucchini Pickles with Rosemary and Sage(Paleo, Vegan, Gluten Free)

There always seems to be too much zucchini and squash in the garden. It can be hard to find enough ways to use it all up. Fortunately, this savory zucchini pickle recipe will help you make the most of an abundant harvest. Other Zucchini Recipes: Coconut Flour Zucchini Bread Vegan Pesto with Zucchini Other Pickle Recipes: Garlic Pickled Greens Small Footprint Dill Pickles Heirloom Tomato Pickles Simple Pickled Beets Zucchini Pickles with Rosemary and Sage A delicious way to preserve the zucchini harvest. 1 small red onion (very thinly sliced OR 2 shallots, sliced OR 1/2 cup chives, chopped) 2 cups zucchini (or yellow summer squash, sliced into rounds or ribbons) 2 to 4 sprigs fresh rosemary (stems removed) 4 to 6 leaves fresh sage (chopped roughly) 1 Tbsp. sea salt 1 cup purified water 1/3 cup raw apple cider vinegar ((optional for speed pickles. <strong>Do not use if fermenting</strong>.)) Mix sliced zucchini, onion and herbs and tightly pack into a clean, sterile 16-ounce glass jar until about 3/4 full. Dissolve sea salt in water to create brine solution. Stir until salt is dissolved, then add vinegar, if using. Pour liquid into jar to cover zucchini and herbs. Add more filtered water if necessary so you only leave about an inch of room at the top.

Continue reading Zucchini Pickles with Rosemary and Sage<br/>(Paleo, Vegan, Gluten Free) at Small Footprint Family.

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Small Footprint Dill Pickles

Small Footprint Dill Pickles

Here is my easy recipe for lacto-fermented, homemade dill pickles that can also be made with vinegar, so they can be ready to eat almost right after making them—speed pickles!

Or, for probiotic bounty and digestive health, you can leave out the vinegar and make these pickles traditionally by fermenting them in brine—in which case they will be ready in a week or two.

If you are going to ferment these pickles in brine, a special airlock lid for your wide-mouth canning jar is extremely helpful. An airlock lid releases excess carbon dioxide from the jar automatically without needing to regularly “burp” the lid by hand. It keeps all oxygen out which helps create the highest amount of healthy gut bacteria (probiotics) possible in your ferment, and prevents mold. (where to airlock jar lids online)

More Pickle Recipes

  • Dilly Snap Peas
  • Watermelon Rind Pickles
  • Simple Pickled Beets
  • Simple Homemade Sauerkraut
  • Heirloom Tomato Pickles

Small Footprint Dill Pickles

This easy homemade dill pickle recipe will deliciously preserve some of your summer produce.

Continue reading Small Footprint Dill Pickles at Small Footprint Family.

Will August 2018 be the hottest month on record?

July and August are typically about 3.6ºC or 6.5ºF warmer than December and January. August is typically 1.8°C or 3.24ºF warmer than the average annual temperature. Above image shows how much higher the temperature was for selected months, compared to…